With Macro and Micro, we usually have a vivid set of systems to look at that has its own set of definitions and explanations. For instance, if we consider economics as the base, the term micro and macro in the prefix puts the base in focus in different dimensions. The same goes for microevolution, macroevolution, macro variation, micro variation, and the list is never-ending. 

Macro and Micro, how are they different? Let's walkthrough.

What are the differences between Macro and Micro?

Sometimes, we get confused over placing the terms "Macro" and "Micro" in separate boxes. A clear look will make you understand that both the words differ by a letter; however, when we talk about the meaning they portray, scenes are pretty. The main difference between the two is that macro tends towards conveying something very prominent. In comparison, Micro is used to refer to anything small. 

What is Macro?

Macro is a word in the English language that is derived from the Greek word Makros meaning large or long. The term is usually used as an adjective, noun, and also as a combining form in any sentence.

When anyone refers to anything with the term macro, he or she means that the entity is "large." A macromolecule, for instance, is a molecule that is comparatively very large in size. These are basically composed of hundreds and thousands of covalently bonded atoms. 

Examples of Macro:

  • Macroeconomics: In simple words, it's a branch of economics. It revolves around large-scale economic factors. These factors include national fiscal policy, interest rates, etc. 
  • Macroevolution: Macroevolution deals with biological evolution. 
  • Macromolecule: It is a molecule along with several atoms.

What is Micro?

Micro is a word in the English language that is derived from the Greek word Mikros meaning small or short. Similar to Macro, Micro is also used as an adjective, noun, and also as a combining form in any sentence.

When anyone signifies anything with the term micro, he or she means that the entity is "small." A microorganism, for instance, is a tiny living organism that is invisible to naked eyes. Those small living creatures are viewed with the help of an instrument called a microscope. Overall, you can understand that the scene revolves around something that focuses "small." 

Examples of Micro:

  • Microorganism: A microorganism is a kind of organism that is very small in size. It includes parasites and bacteria, which cause fermentation or illness. 
  • Microeconomics: Just like macroeconomics, microeconomics is also a branch of economics. It focuses primarily on individual factors or decisions. For example, the monetary policy of an institution or their marketing strategy for a new product or new price level. 
  • Micron: Micron is a unit of measurement. It approximately equals one-millionth of a meter.

Difference Between Macro and Micro

Meaning

Macro is a word in the English language that refers to something large or prominent. At the same time, Micro is a word that means small.

Origin

Macro is derived from the Greek word “Makros,” while the same for Micro is from another Greek word, “ Mikros.”

Etymology

Macro: From French, From Latin (Macro). From Ancient Greek (Makros)

Micro: From New Latin (Micro), from Ancient Greek (Mikros)

Usage as an Adjective

The term Macro is usually used as an adjective or is placed just before a noun to signify something that scales very large, prominent. Micro is also used as an adjective or as a prefix. It determines anything which is indeed very small, restricted.

Usage as a Combining Form

As a combining form, Macro implies a term that refers to being “long,” “long-term,” or something similar. At the same time, the combining form of Micro leaves the essence of “small.”

Synonyms

For Macro:

big, large, large-scale, prominent, capacious, colossal, copious, enormous, global, huge, immense, jumbo, massive, and voluminous.

For Micro:

tiny, small, puny, miniature, minute, wee, imperceptible, minuscule, petite, teensy, teeny, pygmy, atomic, bitsy, bitty, microminiature, microscopical, pocket, and slight.

Comparison Chart: Macro Vs Micro

ParametersMacroMicro
MeaningLargeSmall
OriginGreek word MakrosGreek word Mikros
EtymologyFrom French, From Latin (Macro). From Ancient Greek (Makros)From New Latin (Micro), from Ancient Greek (Mikros)
Usage as AdjectiveProminentRestricted
Usage as a Combining FormLongShort
Synonymsbig, large, large-scale, prominent, capacious, colossal, copious, enormous, global, huge, immense, jumbo, massive, and voluminous.tiny, small, puny, miniature, minute, wee, imperceptible, minuscule, petite, teensy, teeny, pygmy, atomic, bitsy, bitty, microminiature, microscopical, pocket, and slight.

Similarity: How is Macro Similar to Micro

When we consider Macro and Micro, both come out to be different in many aspects. However, one thing that sits common is the usage form. Both Macro and Micro are words in the English language that generally occur as adjectives, nouns, and as a combining form.

Frequently Asked Questions

Should Macro and Micro be Hyphenated?

The approach to use a hyphen with words associated with Macro and Micro is entirely subjective. These words are two prefixes that are usually hyphenated less frequently.

How is micro different from macro?

Micro is a term that usually refers to someone very small. Macro, on the other hand, deals with comparatively bigger entities. The term is also used to signify anything prominent.

Conclusion

And that is pretty much it. We're done talking about all the elements that form the basis of the difference between micro and macro. We hope you'll have no problem using the terms while writing sentences in a meaningful manner. 

Remembering the usage of Macro and Micro is pretty simple. While the former means large, the latter refers to small entities. Also they're distinct in how they spell. One way to get over the confused state is considering the "ma" in macro as something massive.

In case your mind bears any issue, make sure to let us know. Also, comment on the ideas that you might wish us to cover in the future.

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